What kind of society is Cambodia?

What is the society of Cambodia?

The great majority of the people share the same, cultural heritage. They practice Theravada Buddhism, speak the Khmer language and most have a rural background. The culture has been relatively free of strife between diverse social groups and, has developed without class conflict or social upheaval.

Is Cambodia a socialist country?

Cambodia was not really a socialist country before 1993, it was too poor and damaged by the Khmer Rouge years to have an economic system sophisticated enough to be called “socialism”. The Hun Sen government of the day was, however, rooted in communism and consisted of pro-Vietnamese defectors from the Khmer Rouge.

Is Cambodia a democracy?

The constitution proclaims a liberal, multiparty democracy in which powers are devolved to the executive, the judiciary and the legislature. Furthermore, the governing charter declares Cambodia to be an “independent, sovereign, peaceful, permanently neutral and non-aligned State.”

Why did Vietnam invade Cambodia?

Vietnam launched an invasion of Cambodia in late December 1978 to remove Pol Pot. Two million Cambodians had died at the hands of his Khmer Rouge regime and Pol Pot’s troops had conducted bloody cross-border raids into Vietnam, Cambodia’s historic enemy, massacring civilians and torching villages.

Is Cambodia corrupt?

Transparency International’s 2017 Corruption Perception Index ranks the country 161st place out of 180 countries.

What is the problem in Cambodia?

The GNP level of Cambodia is very low and it is a low income country. A poor-and-needy ratio exceeds 30% of population, and the population growth rate is high, so poverty doesn’t decrease. Moreover, social welfare systems such as education, insurance, medical treatment, and public services are also poorly funded.

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What are the human rights in Cambodia?

Significant human rights issues included: torture by the government; arbitrary detention by the government; political prisoners; arbitrary interference in the private lives of citizens, including pervasive electronic media surveillance; the absence of judicial independence; censorship and selectively enforced criminal …

Inside view of Asia