How many Malaysians are diabetic?

How common is diabetes in Malaysia?

Diabetes is a major public health concern in Malaysia, and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has escalated to 20.8% in adults above the age of 30, affecting 2.8 million individuals. The burden of managing diabetes falls on primary and tertiary health care providers operating in various settings.

Is diabetes a serious problem in Malaysia and other countries?

Background: Diabetes is a major public health concern in Malaysia, and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has escalated to 20.8% in adults above the age of 30, affecting 2.8 million individuals. The burden of managing diabetes falls on primary and tertiary health care providers operating in various settings.

What nationality has the lowest diabetes?

Diabetes prevalence rates among Asian Americans also differ by countries of origin, (Table 3) [7]. Asian Indians have the highest diabetes prevalence rate (14.2%), whereas Asian Americans from Korea and Japan have the lowest diabetes prevalence rates 4.0% and 4.9%, respectively.

Do Japanese get diabetes?

The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in Japan, and it is estimated that more than 12 million Japanese people are hyperglycemic. This high prevalence is most likely the result of a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors specific to Japan.

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What is the main cause of diabetes?

What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease.

What is diabetes in Malay?

noun. medical. a person who suffers from diabetes. penghidap kencing manis.

How common is diabetes in Singapore?

In Singapore, over 400,000 Singaporeans live with the disease. The lifetime risk of developing diabetes is one in three among Singaporeans, and the number of those with diabetes is projected to surpass one million by 2050 [1].

Who is most at risk for type 2 diabetes?

Those most at risk of developing type 2 diabetes include:

  • people with pre-diabetes.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 35 and over.
  • people aged 35 and over who are Pacific Islanders, Maori, Asian (including the Indian subcontinent, or of Chinese origin) Middle Eastern, North African or Southern European.

Can diabetes be cured?

There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels.

Inside view of Asia